Starting out in IT

I recently received an email from a family friend asking what courses or certifications he should look into for getting started in IT. Without knowing what particularly interests him about IT, I wrote the following email and decided it might be useful for others just starting out.

TL;DR: Learn Linux, a scripting language of some kind (Python, Javascript, Bash, etc.), and basics of networking.

I’d whole-heartedly recommend starting with some sort of Linux certification/course. This will provide a solid foundation for whatever direction you decide to take in the I.T. field, be it developer, networking, operations, sys admin., cyber-security etc. They all take root in Linux/Unix systems and having a solid background in it will definitely get you off the ground running.

After this, I’d recommend picking up some sort of scripting language (Python, Bash, Javascript), it doesn’t really matter which, just get really good with at least one and build some stuff with it (even silly/stupid stuff). As you progress in your career/education, you’ll naturally pick up others along the way.

Things I’ve learned the hard way:

– Be a team player and learn from each other. Nobody makes it on their own and everyone is better than you at *something*, learn from this.

– Don’t get discouraged. Everybody in IT was once where you are right now. You’ll never learn everything there is to know, and any employer or individual that expects you to, isn’t worth your time. IT is a life of learning.

– Leave you ego at the door. This can sometimes be a difficult one and it may just be something you learn over time. I’ve interviewed several individuals that we passed on due to ego. Some of the best technologists I’ve worked with are those that always kept an open mind to different ways of doing things and didn’t succumb to one-up-man ship. It’s okay to be right, but be willing to entertain other points-of-view.

– Use the best tool for the job. There’s no single piece of technology for every task. Don’t pigeon-hole your skill-set. Just because you can make something work, doesn’t mean you should.